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bart williams
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bunch of ?'s

New to Site and this is my first forum.

I'm a environmental field geologist with 15 yrs of exp. The environmental field has dried up in the midwest. I've been around rigs all those years, but have never been deeper than 350'bgs. I'm starting to get bored anyways.

I have alot of questions about entering into the oil and gas fields.

The big ones are can you make a decent living?

How do you travel between rigs?

Is it better to work for a mudlogging company or a Oil company?

My skill set is better suited away from the office. Do most loggers feel the same?

07-17-2009 11:55 PM
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TexasLogger
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RE: bunch of ?'s

Hey Bart

just to answer a few of your questions,

1. You can make a decent living mudlogging, but that all depends on how much you are making now.

2. I get to drive my car back and forth from jobs. I usually work about 10-15 days straight, then get like 7-9 days off.

3. I think that it would be better working for yourself.

4. I never want to work in an office.

09-02-2009 01:50 AM
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Bolen Consulting
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RE: bunch of ?'s

I can set you up with some names to call if you are wanting to train and are willing to move to Texas. Your geology degree will take you a long way.

As for your questions:

1. Yes you can make a decent living, if you find the right clients you can make a very good living. Before the crash I was pulling down 800 a day covering two rigs in West Texas. (400/day per rig)

2. For land rigs, most mudloggers live on site or in a hotel near by. Some have Travel Trailers and set them up at the nearest RV park so they have their own place to go after their shift.
Off-shore you arrive at the rig either on a crew boat (think floating bus) or via helicopter. I preffered the helo route as crew boat rides can last upwards of 10 hours to get to deep water rigs.

3. I work for myself. It allows me the freedom to negotiate my rates regularly and allows me some perks tax wise.

4. A oil rig is nothing but a big office. The days of "wild west" drilling are all but over. Now everything is very organized, well planned, and strictly regulated. Just like an office you will have to deal with politics, gossip, dead lines and small talk.

Have no illusions, the only way to make money as a mudlogger is to be on site, away from friends and family, away from your bed. After you gain experience and start your own company or start consulting you can make some of your own rules, if you get steady work you can move into the area and sleep in your own bed and pick your kids up from school etc. etc.

Mudlogging has it's ups and downs, it is WORK after all!

After 10 years I make a good living and have a good reputation, I've missed many holidays and birthdays to get to this point.

Hope I helped!

05-16-2010 02:37 PM
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lotsarock2
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RE: bunch of ?'s

Hi,

I am Carol Maddox and have been logging since 1978 or at least that is when I started getting paid for it. My father owned his own logging company in Calgary, Alberta Canada. I was a mud engineer for Milchem for 8 yrs and was transfered to Ok. in 1981 and still there. I guess what my question is: I keep thinking about going out on my own but something is holding me back. Is it fear of failure or just easier being a logger and let someone else have the headaches. Any advice pro's and cons about going out on my own. Also I am new to this site and it is showing me as a jr logger. How do I change that to a senior logger? lol but I haven't been a jr logger in alot of yrs.

Sincerely,

Carol Maddox

03-14-2011 10:30 AM
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Charles Miller
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RE: bunch of ?'s

I just registered and am in an identical situation in that I am also a Geologist in the environmental field in the midwest. I am thinking of doing some mudlogging also. Please let me know what you find out.

04-13-2011 07:22 PM
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Darryl Maddox
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RE: bunch of ?'s

Hello Carol,

Is it possible we know each other? Ever work for TDS out of OK City?
IF so long time no see. IF not nothing lost.

I"ve been on my own for about 2 1/2 years. Lots of pit falls and incredible amount of hard work taking care of equipment + running the business. Be sure you have deep pockets or a real friendly banker and a very good reputation among potential customers. There is a lot to be said for most people for logging for someone and letting them do all the worrying. My recommendation is "if you are thinking about it - don't" If you can't imagine working for someone else any longer and have the unqualified support of spouce and friends (preferably with money in case the banker fails) then maybe. When times are hard you don't need anyone second guessing your decision. You'll do enough of that yourself. Personally I'm glad I took the leap and would love to say I did it myself. But realisitically a couple of people pushed me over the edge and the banker provided the bungee cords when I almost hit the rocks. In addition, one night when I was out with friends and family, geting ready to go on my 2nd job and so scared I was near throwing up at the dinner table one of the friends looked at me and then said = Don't worry, there is more money where that came from". With out them and that kind of encouragement I would never have made it. AND BE SURE YOU KEEP YOUR EQUIPMENT SUPPLIERS PAID ON TIME - crashes are inevitable and overnight support essential if you are going to stay in business long enough to build up a supply of backup equpment.

02-19-2013 10:56 PM
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RL_Brunner
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RE: bunch of ?'s

To you Environmental Geologist, I too worked for Environmental/Engineering Companies for the past 20+ years. Collecting environmental samples, installing shallow groundwater wells and describing soil profiles using the USCS is far different than describing lithologic cuttings from a petroleum borehole. I strongly suggest some online classes such as www.petroskills. Recreating petro-historical lithologic sections and describing depositional environments from the borehole cuttings can differentiate an average mudloggers from a petroleum-thinking engaged well-site geologist that is part of a prospect evaluation team. Add as much value to your work as possible.

04-04-2013 02:28 AM
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